Categories
Uncategorized

VINCENT VAN GOGH BIOGRAPHY

Vincent van Gogh, one of the most well-known post-impressionist artists, for whom color was the chief symbol of expression, was born in Groot-Zundert, Holland on March 30, 1853. The son of a pastor, brought up in a religious and cultured atmosphere, Vincent was highly emotional, lacked self-confidence and struggled with his identity and with direction.

Between 1860 and 1880, when he finally decided to become an artist, van Gogh had already experienced two unsuitable and unhappy romances and had worked unsuccessfully as a clerk in a bookstore, an art salesman, and a preacher in the Borinage (a dreary mining district in Belgium) where he was dismissed for overzealousness.

Van Gogh’s finest works were produced in less than three years in a technique that grew more and more impassioned in brush stroke, in symbolic and intense color, in surface tension, and in the movement and vibration of form and line. Van Gogh’s inimitable fusion of form and content is powerful; dramatic, lyrically rhythmic, imaginative, and emotional, for the artist was completely absorbed in the effort to explain either his struggle against madness or his comprehension of the spiritual essence of man and nature.

In spite of his lack of success during his lifetime, van Gogh’s legacy lives on having left a lasting impact on the world of art. Van Gogh is now viewed as one of the most influential artists having helped lay the foundations of modern art.

REF: vangoghgallery.com

PIC: History and Biography, Encyclopedia Britannica, La Nacion, Sports & Life

Categories
Uncategorized

Inside The Terrifying But Necessary Job Of A Medieval Plague Doctor

Tasked with treating victims of the Black Death, plague doctors wore all-leather suits and beak-like masks to avoid catching the fatal disease.

The Black Death was the deadliest epidemic of bubonic plague in history, wiping out some 25 million Europeans alone in just a few years. Out of desperation, cities hired a new breed of physician — so-called plague doctors — who were either second-rate physicians, young physicians with limited experience, or who had no certified medical training at all.

The primary responsibilities of a plague doctor, or Medico della Peste, were not to cure or treat patients. Their duties were more administrative and laborious as they kept track of casualties of the Black Death, assisted in the occasional autopsy, or witnessed wills for the dead and dying.

Today we know that the bubonic and subsequent plagues like pneumonia were caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis which was carried by rats and common in urban settings. The last urban outbreak of plague in the United States occurred in Los Angeles in 1924 and we since have found a cure in common antibiotics.

This early hazmat suit and those horrific treatments remain thankfully in the past, but the willingness of plague doctors to separate the sick from the healthy, to burn the contaminated, and experiment with treatments, has not been lost on history.

REF: Allthatsinteresting.com

PIC: Allthatsinteresting.com, History | Howstuffworks, Ranker, Simplicity Cocktails, Tom Banwell Designs

Categories
Uncategorized

The Face of Beatrice Cenci

The painting that inspired Shelley and Stendahl is thought to be of a young woman executed on 11 September 1599 for the murder of her father.

Charles Dickens, visiting Rome early in 1845, found himself haunted by a painting. It was, he said, ‘almost impossible to be forgotten’. It was of a young woman with a white turban, looking back over her shoulder towards the artist.

The painting’s subject was Beatrice Cenci. She had been executed in September 1599, aged 22, along with her mother and her brother, for the murder of her father, Count Francesco Cenci.

Dickens was one of many moved by the painting; it inspired works from both Shelley and Stendahl. But it wasn’t connected to Beatrice until the late 18th century. It was later attributed to the Bolognese artist, Guido Reni, who was said to have seen Beatrice in her cell, or else on her way to her execution. 

It is now thought to be by Ginevra Cantofoli, one of several forgotten women artists in Bologna during the Baroque period – and not of Cenci at all. Perhaps an execution and an erasure go together, Romantic projections of one woman’s suffering serving to obscure and flatten two women’s lives.

REF: Historytoday.com

PIC: Historytoday.com, Artsyfartsy-WordPress.com, https://www.decollete.us/gallery/beatrice-cenci, Getty images1

Categories
Uncategorized

A Brief History of Van Gogh’s Starry Night

Today, Vincent van Gogh stands as one of the most celebrated artists of the nineteenth century, and his painting, The Starry Night, completed in 1889, is not only one of his most famous works, but also one of the most famous paintings in the world. Yet van Gogh and his beloved painting were not always as famous as they are today.

Vincent van Gogh painted The Starry Night in 1889 while he was staying in Saint-Paul asylum in Saint-Rémy, France, where he lived for a year following a breakdown and the mutilation of his left ear. Painted with oil on canvas, the artist attempted to capture the view from the window in his room.

Though the painter preferred working from observation, he was not allowed to paint in his room, so he began painting the star he had seen in his studio without the view for reference, applying paint to the canvas directly from the tubes to create the image’s iconic thick lines and intense colors.

Created only a year before his death, The Starry Night is one of the paintings Jo van Gogh-Bonger inherited from her husband. 

Since the MoMA’s acquisition of the painting, viewers have been transfixed by van Gogh’s interpretation of the nighttime view from his window in Saint-Rémy, and The Starry Night now stands as one of the most famous works of Western art.

REF: www.artandobject.com

PIC: Insider, Encyclopedia Britannica, Far Out Magazine, The New York Times, My Modern Met

Categories
Uncategorized

Who Invented Ice Cream? Inside The Surprisingly Long History Of The World’s Favorite Frozen Treat

Children chase after ice cream trucks in the summer, the heartbroken dig into a pint after a break-up, and this frozen favorite fills entire aisles at grocery stores. But even though we all take it for granted these days, the question remains: Who invented ice cream?

This popular dessert wasn’t invented all at once. Rather, the invention of ice cream as we know it today took centuries.

Most sources seem to agree that the earliest “ice cream” came from China around 200 BCE The BBC and Reader’s Digest report that people ate a very early version of ice cream made of ice, rice and milk.

According to the International Dairy Foods Association, ice cream became widely available in the 19th century. And that’s when ice cream developed even more with the invention of “ice cream cones” and “ice cream sundaes.”

As such, the history of ice cream is a rich one. This tasty frozen treat has been in development, in one way or another, for thousands of years. And it’s arguably still being perfected.

REF: Allthatsinteresting.com

PIC: Allthatsinteresting.com, Encyclopedia Britannica, History Today, Reader’s Digest

Categories
Uncategorized

The Fascinating History Of The Drinking Horn, The Thirst-Quenching Vessel Of Viking Legend

When most people think of a drinking horn, they picture Vikings dressed in fur clothing and battle helmets guzzling mead after a day of raiding villages. While the Norsemen did use drinking horns, the history of the vessel is far more varied — and begins over 1,000 years prior to the Viking Age.

An ancient account from the Greek historian Xenophon of the Thracian leader Seuthes around the fourth century B.C.E. suggests that the horn was part and parcel of the Thracian way of life. The words Xenophon used to describe its use were “kata ton Thrakion nomon” or “after the Thracian fashion.”

Romans began using their own version of the drinking horn around the same time. Rather than the more primitive animal horns or the metal vessels adorned with the carved heads of animals that the Greeks preferred, the Romans made their version out of beautiful, decorative glass, according to The Vintage News.

Though it originated in antiquity, the drinking horn didn’t remain in the past. In the 19th and 20th centuries, lavish vessels made of ivory, gold, and porcelain emerged as decorative luxuries in Austria and Germany.

With such a diverse history, it’s clear that the Viking drinking horn is so much more than that. A storied item found in countless cultures throughout the centuries, the intoxicating vessel can still be seen today in museums and at dinner tables around the world.

REF: Allthatsinteresting.com

PIC: All That’s Interesting, Strange Ago-, Alamy, Museum Replicas

Categories
Uncategorized

Why Did World War II Start?

World War II

A number of historical factors led to World War II. Germany’s defeat in World War I and the punishing Treaty of Versailles sowed resentment among many Germans. This, and the economic downturn of the 1930s, paved the way for the rise of Adolf Hitler — who often blamed Jews for Germany’s problems.

World War II

At the same time, Japan had begun to build its large empire in the Pacific. Throughout the 1930s, Japanese forces were increasingly aggressive toward China, culminating with the Japanese invasion of the country in 1937.

World War II

(As the conflict dragged on, Japan would go on to commit numerous war crimes, including forcing over 200,000 girls and women into sexual slavery, conducting experiments on kidnapped Chinese civilians, and regularly executing — and sometimes even cannibalizing — their prisoners of war.)

World War II

And, just as in World War I, varying alliances bound many countries together. Germany and Japan had signed an Anti-Comintern Pact in 1936, which Italy joined in 1937, laying the foundation for the Axis powers. Likewise, France and Britain promised to protect Poland shortly before Germany invaded in 1939.

World War II
A young child cries amidst the rubble of a destroyed train station in Shanghai, China, in 1937.

REF: allthatsinteresting.com

PIC: allthatsinteresting.com, nationalww2museum.org, history.com, JAPAN FOCUS, Literary Hub

Categories
Native American History

In the realms of Norse Mythology

Welcome,

Last chance! This week is a new free book launch, “The Völva’s Apprentice”

In the realms of Norse Mythology, a girl sets out to avenge her village only to meet a powerful teacher on her journey into the abyss of forbidden knowledge.

Click here to download your FREE Copy 

https://dl.bookfunnel.com/rxrebezp53

And here is the book on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BF16NN2T

We would appreciate your review on Amazon by Mid October.

Best regards,

History Brought Alive

Categories
Uncategorized

The History Of The First Lightbulb And Who Really Invented It

While Thomas Edison is credited with inventing the first practical incandescent bulb in 1879, the story of who invented the lightbulb is much more complicated. Indeed, Edison’s patent for the lightbulb was referred to as “an improvement” on existing models.

Throughout the 19th century, inventors searched for a safer and more convenient method of producing light to replace open flames or gaslighting. Electricity became the favorite alternative.

Meanwhile, Thomas Alva Edison was working across the pond to solve the same problems. The 31-year old inventor had 169 patents by that time and had established a research facility in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

Edison developed the infrastructure needed to make incandescent lighting a vital part of society. Edison and his team developed electrical plants to power homes at large and power meters to measure its usage.

In the end, it is Edison who is best remembered as the inventor of the lightbulb, in part for his penchant for publicity and his determination to make the lightbulb a common household item. Certainly, credit belongs to Edison as it was his design and his electrical infrastructure that set the tempo for the world’s lightbulb as we know it today. 

Perhaps it is fair to say that Edison’s genius was not so much in his innovation, but rather in his ability to apply practicality to inventions that otherwise may have just stayed in the laboratory.

REF: allthatsinteresting.com

PIC: allthatsinteresting.com, Live Science, www.history.com, Bricsys, Big Visioners-Medium

Categories
Uncategorized

Medieval map of Britain may reveal evidence of mythological islands

A medieval map may show evidence of a mythical landscape that is now underwater in what is now Cardigan Bay, Wales

A faded medieval map of Britain may reveal evidence of “long lost” islands detailed in Welsh mythology, a new study finds. 

According to Welsh mythology, the drowned land of Cantre’r Gwaelod had a ruler before the ocean washed it away.

REF: Livescience

PIC: GHIL, Alamy, The Times, History Extra